Archive for May, 2009

Autodesk Gallery at One Market Awarded LEED Platinum Certification

Thursday, May 21st, 2009

By: PR Newswire

USGBC Recognizes Autodesk San Francisco Design Gallery and Office Space; Second LEED Platinum for Commercial Interiors in California

SAN FRANCISCO, May 20 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ — Autodesk (Nasdaq: ADSK) announced that its Autodesk Gallery at One Market in San Francisco and newly renovated office space in the historic Landmark Building at One Market has received Platinum certification in the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED for Commercial Interiors (LEED-CI) rating system. The Autodesk offices are one of only four Platinum-certified projects in San Francisco, and second in the state of California under the commercial interiors rating.

(Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20090520/SF20136)

Design firms Anderson Anderson Architecture, HOK, general contracting firm DPR Construction and law firm Hanson Bridgett worked with Autodesk to renovate the space using an integrated project delivery (IPD) approach – an emerging business model in the building industry that allows the entire extended team to collaborate and efficiently drive projects toward their best outcomes. Using the Autodesk Revit platform for building information modeling (BIM), the integrated team was able to exchange highly accurate project data very early in the design process and optimize the sustainable design elements in the building, such as natural daylight, and using recycled content.

“While IPD requires high levels of collaboration, BIM serves as a decision-making platform that facilitates collaboration and makes IPD possible,” said Phil Bernstein, FAIA, Autodesk vice president of industry strategy and relations. “These are concepts that we believe will change the future of the industry, and we felt it was important to use both of these methodologies as we are also advocating their use to our customers.”

One of only a handful of IPD projects across the globe, the San Francisco renovation overcame many of the common obstacles in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industries, including material waste and procedural inefficiency. This IPD approach enabled the teams to fast-track the design and construction schedule and achieve the ambitious LEED Platinum certification.

“We are excited for the entire project team that the Autodesk office space in San Francisco has achieved LEED Platinum certification,” said Marc H. Flax, Associate AIA, senior vice president and director at HOK San Francisco. “From the beginning stages of this IPD project, the extended team agreed contractually to share both the risks and rewards of this ambitious project. LEED Platinum certification was a goal and certainly qualifies as a huge reward. This level of collaboration and sustainable design is something that we want to repeat on future projects.”

In the LEED Platinum space is the Autodesk Gallery at One Market, which showcases the work of Autodesk customers and illustrates the role of software in great design and the process that takes an idea and turns it into a reality. The Gallery highlights over 20 highly visual projects, such as the California Academy of Sciences, a Ford Shelby GT500, an 8.5 foot LEGO dinosaur and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge seismic retrofit. The Gallery is a location where designers can discuss the latest in technology and be inspired by others’ work.

Autodesk also completed the first IPD project in New England, a 65,000-square-foot office building in Waltham, Massachusetts, that contains the headquarters for its AEC industry group and the Autodesk Gallery Boston. Using the Autodesk Revit platform, the architecture and contracting firms were able to create coordinated, digital design information and documentation, and use that information to more accurately predict energy performance, as well as appearance and cost. Autodesk is in the process of seeking Platinum LEED for Commercial Interiors and LEED Gold Certification for core and shell. The Autodesk Gallery Portland highlights customer examples from the manufacturing industry and exhibits the most advanced Digital Prototyping technology for the automotive and transportation, consumer product and industrial machinery markets. The Autodesk Gallery Portland has recently received LEED certification.

The Autodesk Gallery at One Market is open to the public on the first Wednesday of each month from 1 to 5 p.m.

About Autodesk

Autodesk, Inc., is a world leader in 2D and 3D design software for the manufacturing, building and construction, and media and entertainment markets. Since its introduction of AutoCAD software in 1982, Autodesk has developed the broadest portfolio of state-of-the-art Digital Prototyping solutions to help customers experience their ideas before they are real. Fortune 1000 companies rely on Autodesk for the tools to visualize, simulate and analyze real-world performance early in the design process to save time and money, enhance quality and foster innovation. For additional information about Autodesk, visit www.autodesk.com.

Autodesk, AutoCAD, and Revit are registered trademarks or trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., and/or its subsidiaries and/or affiliates in the USA and/or other countries. All other brand names, product names, or trademarks belong to their respective holders. Autodesk reserves the right to alter product offerings and specifications at any time without notice, and is not responsible for typographical or graphical errors that may appear in this document.

(C) 2009 Autodesk, Inc. All rights reserved.

Bouctouche: thinking green and becoming sustainable

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

Thinking green does not cost anything. As Denny Richard, Director of Sustainable Development for the Town of Bouctouche, puts it, “it’s just another way of thinking, new criteria for doing things.”

“Thinking Green” is the motto of Bouctouche’s green plan. Going through the process of creating this plan brings together representatives with many viewpoints, from youth, to business and industry to the general population. Uniting new perspectives creates new ideas and priorities, albeit with limited financial and human resources. The benefits can be astounding.

Bouctouche’s recent environmental history reaches back to the 1990s when the natural feature of their 12-kilometre sand dune was highlighted. The protection of the dune became a strong symbol for the population,” says Denny Richard. The Irving Eco-Park Interpretive Centre and a two kilometre elevated boardwalk were constructed. Land was reserved for parking and thousands of people began flocking to the beach. Actions to reduce B&Bs and inns environmental impact were implemented.

Bouctouche’s new path of ecotourism, now the town’s economic driver, was under way.

What distinguishes a green plan from a standard municipal plan?

“The green plan,” explains Mathieu D’Astous, environmental consultant and developer of Bouctouche’s new plan, “respects the principles of sustainability, looking to create a balance or harmony with the environment. Its goals are the social, environmental and economic benefits, basically a triple bottom line.” Part of the process of developing a green plan is to bring new awareness to the citizens while simultaneously getting feedback and suggestions to build the plan. To that end, public consultations with a dozen community groups, schools and public meetings were held.

Social environment

The most difficult challenge is to change people’s habits to live more lightly on the planet. Public events celebrating Earth Day and an Eco-Festival (this year Sept. 18-20) and other activities attracted the same small segment of the population, observed Denny Richard. So, he obtained funding through the NB Environmental Trust Fund and Young Canada Works to hire a student. Last summer, she went door-to-door, meeting the residents and giving out a kit. The Eco-kit contained two reusable bags, a compact fluorescent bulb and info about the separation of waste and composting. Information about Efficiency NB’s energy audits was included too, A new website, the Green Tool Box, also has lots of tips. The town puts an accent on events gathering people together and promoting a sense of belonging and pride in their community. Continuing education of the mayor, councilors and employees of the town is done, and of course, the citizens.

By the way, Denny consulted Blackle, a new search engine by Google which is more energy efficient due to the black screen.

Physical environment

The green plan recommended an improvement of the urban forest. Limited human resources lead to creative thinking, resulting in a partnership between the town and the Université de Moncton Edmundston campus’ Forestry faculty. A student forester developed a 20-year plan to improve the green infrastructure. Phase 1 of the plan to increase biodiversity and to ensure succession (new generations of trees) is under way.

Another partnership between the town and the K.C. Irving Chair of Sustainable Development, U de M, was created for land use planning. An inventory of fragile ecosystems and habitat mapping will help better assess where and what future development should occur.

Transportation: The council wants to look into a shuttle service for commuters to Moncton and, during the day, use the same service to bring ecotourists to Bouctouche.

Economy: energy efficiency

The municipality began a sweep of their operations. Energy audits resulted in the installation of heat pumps in some municipal buildings with a pay back time of three to five years; and $10,000 has been saved annually by conservation at their sewage lagoon. An investment in LED Christmas lights, payback in two years, reduced the electricity bill from $600 to $17. Signs describe what is green and what is blue for the separation of wastes.

Internally, a greenhouse gas inventory has been completed: Step 1 of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities’ Partners for Climate Protection five-step program. Steps 2 and 3 will set targets for GHG reduction and make an action plan to implement them.

Eco farming at the outskirts of Bouctouche is on the rise. Produce is brought to the popular Farmer’s Market each Saturday.

The council has displayed enough interest in wind energy for the town’s self-sufficiency to have secured funding for a study, gathering wind regime data for one year. The results will be the potential energy and financial feasibility of such a venture. This is another partnership with the FCM, the NB Environmental Trust Fund and the K.C. Irving Chair of Sustainable Development.

The goal of the municipality of Bouctouche is to become a truly sustainable community, preserving the natural environment. The municipal leaders are eager to innovate and are always looking for new ideas to make Bouctouche a more resilient coastal town.

n Beth McLaughlin, of Moncton, has a Masters degree in Environmental Studies and is a retired teacher. Her series will appear in this space every Wednesday.

Five Reasons…Why Portland Kicks Seattle’s Ass

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

By Bart Blasengame

05_24_mud_5_reasons Illustration: Paul Corio When Seattle magazine printed “Five Reasons Not to Move to Portland” in February, we were nonplussed. We figured we’d scan the story, roll our eyes, and go about using it as a coaster. And then we read it. And felt really bad for them. Our mountains are smaller? We grow beards? Lordy, how ever will we recover from such slights? Gee. Here, let us try.

Mass transit. It exists. Thanks to growing populations in both moody cities, commuting can be like undergoing a molar extraction. Portland eases the burden with frequent, partly free, and mostly clean mass transit. Seattle’s solution is a pointless monorail. And a floating bridge. That sank. Advantage, PDX.

Our beans are supreme. Seattle spawned Starbucks, which is now being mocked by the new McCafés at McDonald’s. We grew Stumptown. ’Nuff said.

We’re tougher. Mount Hood (Seattle called it “short” and “measly”) is really a volcano, and it’s got a body count higher than most Rambo flicks. In fact, you can see four volcanoes from downtown Portland, each of which could erupt at any second. Which means, theoretically, that we cheat death just by waking up.

We don’t have to try. Did we ask the New York Times to crown us the new “sixth borough”? Did we make Sleater-Kinney move to town? No. It just happened. While Seattle has pimped itself out to anyone with a working flash, we’ve remained the cool kid in the corner with a pack of smokes rolled in our sleeve.

What’s a sales tax? Even when we hold our noses through the aroma of Tacoma to shop in Seattle, all we have to do is whip out our Oregon driver’s licenses and—poof—instant 6.5 percent discount. It’s a neat trick. You should try it, Seattle. Oh wait, you can’t.

House Bill Seeks to Improve Renewable Fuels Standard

Tuesday, May 19th, 2009

The House Agriculture Committee last week introduced a bill to change provisions in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) that are “limiting the potential for clean, homegrown renewable biofuels to meet our nation’s energy needs.”

The Renewable Fuel Standard Improvement Act (H.R. 2409) was introduced by House Agriculture Committee Chairman Collin Peterson (D-MN) and Ranking Member Frank Lucas (R-OK) along with a bipartisan group of 42 other members of Congress.

“The unreasonable restrictions placed on the biofuels industry in the 2007 Energy Bill were never debated by Congress, and I’ve spent the past two years trying to undo the damage that we’re seeing now that EPA has published the proposed regulations that will make it impossible to meet the RFS,” Peterson said. ““In order to ensure that a clean, homegrown biofuels industry will succeed in the United States, we need to have Federal energy policies are flexible, practical, and innovative.”

Lucas says the most important provision in the bill is the expansion of the acreage eligible to produce biomass feedstock. “This will ease pressure on the current corn production system and it will open the way for more rapid development of next generation ethanol,” he added.

The bill eliminates the requirement that the Environmental Protection Agency consider indirect land use when calculating the greenhouse gas emissions associated with advanced biofuels. Currently, there is no reliable method to predict accurately how biofuel production will affect land use in the United States or internationally.

It also strikes the restrictive definition of renewable biomass included in EISA and replaces it with the definition included in the 2008 Farm Bill. The Farm Bill definition of renewable biomass was developed in consultation with appropriate Federal agencies and other Congressional Committees and was discussed and debated in a transparent manner, unlike the EISA provisions, which were never openly discussed or debated in Congress.

Stop the mining for Uranium in the Grand Canyon

Tuesday, May 19th, 2009

Watch the video below, and then take action here

The Eco-Friendly “I Do”: Ten Tips for Green Weddings From Hornblower Cruises & Events

Monday, May 11th, 2009

An increasing number of couples are saying “I do” to the latest trend in love: green wedding ceremonies. Thanks to an array of elegant yet eco-friendly options, environmentally conscious couples can honor their commitment to a healthy planet as they commit to each other. Sweethearts often save green by going green, as well. As the average wedding price tops $28,000, according to the Brides.com 2009 American Wedding Study, ecologically responsible choices can help cut costs.

“Hornblower has been helping couples and families celebrate commitment and love for nearly 30 years, and we’ve watched a number of trends evolve,” commented Hornblower Cruises & Events CEO Terry MacRae. “A green wedding is the wedding of today and, based on growing interest from our guests, the wedding of the future.”

Looking to celebrate your wedding day in a green way? Here are a few practical tips, courtesy of the professional wedding planners at Hornblower Cruises & Events.

1. Capitalize on natural beauty and cut decorating costs by choosing a venue with a view. Get married in a park, at the local botanical gardens or on the top deck of a yacht at sunset.

2. Opt for a site that accommodates both your ceremony and reception. When that’s not possible, consider walkable options or seek out a green shuttle service.

3. Book responsible event venues. Hornblower vessels feature ENERGY STAR® appliances, energy efficient hand dryers and light bulbs, and green cleaning products. Some of the company’s cruise packages also include carbon-offset credits.

4. Send save-the-date notices, shower invitations and registry information by email. When mailing printed invitations, choose recycled or post-consumer paper and soy-based ink.

5. For receptions and dinners, source organic fare from area farmers and growers. Hornblower Cruises & Events has established relationships with purveyors who provide seasonal, locally grown produce, sustainable seafood and free-range, organic meats.

6. Adorn your wedding venue with reusable linens and soy candle centerpieces.

7. Select seasonal flowers available locally at the time of your wedding. Better yet, decorate with orchids, potted daisies or other flowering plants that can be enjoyed long after the ceremony.

8. Purchase sustainable, eco-friendly “thank you” gifts. For a long-lasting party favor, send guests home with a packet of seeds or a potted plant centerpiece.

9. After the reception, recycle bottles, cans and plastic containers. Avoid plastic utensils and serving ware. If you must use disposable products, choose recycled or biodegradable alternatives. Hornblower follows responsible merchandising guidelines and has an extensive recycling program that extends beyond the company’s boats.

10. Honeymoon at an eco-resort or sign up to clear trails, teach children or build homes on a volunteer vacation.

Hornblower Cruises & Events operates more than 32 yachts in 6 scenic California cities. Vessels in Berkeley, San Francisco, Marina del Rey, Long Beach, Newport Beach and San Diego welcome shower, rehearsal dinner, wedding and reception groups from 2 to 2,200. Hornblower’s professional event planners assist throughout the planning process to coordinate details and ensure an unforgettable experience.

To learn more about planning weddings and special events with Hornblower, visit www.hornblowerweddings.com or call 1-888-HORNBLOWER (1-888-467-6256).

Shipping’s Carbon Footprint Is Gone With the Wind

Sunday, May 10th, 2009

With increasing intolerances for transportation pollution and international greenhouse gas regulations growing, shipping companies are working to develop different greener technologies to deal with emissions, fuel and waste management.Businesses that rely on imported goods can do little to change the truck, rail and marine miles used in transport, but through a new website, GreenShipping companies and individuals can offset the environmental impact of shipping through UPS, USPS and FedEx.

The website allows for businesses to track shipments for pennies a package and accurately gauge the emissions that result. For example, a small package sent by air produces greater CO2 than a box of similar size sent by ground. With most tracking software, you see arrivals, but not necessarily the entire path. GreenShipping uses Google Maps, and is flush with transportation data (including weather issues). Once your package is shipped, they calculate the CO2 generated by the shipment.

Once the emissions have been calculated, GreenShipping works with a non-profit to invest in wind energy, by purchasing carbon offsets to counterbalance greenhouse gas production. The Bonneville Environmental Foundation’s (BEF) Carbon Offsets have met environmental criteria endorsed by the Natural Resources Defense Council and others. BEF’s Carbon Offsets are also certified by Green-e, which certifies and verifies renewable energy and greenhouse gas mitigation products.

GreenShipping can get consumers and businesses alike to consolidate shipments. With carbon offset efforts like this, pressure may raise on shipping companies for greener initiatives, like hybrid/electric conversions and devices that reduce vehicle idling.

Efforts like this may compensate for situations where one cannot buy local and also stimulate sectors that are beginning to receive government incentive, but are still not receiving the funding they need. GreenShipping and the BEF are working to promote wind over coal, and are hopefully highlighting to consumers the problem of air freight, which consumes more fuel than ground.

GreenShipping.com is a property of Green Ventures, Inc., a start-up incubator in Hood River, Oregon, that focuses on the adoption and use of green technology.

Show will highlight ‘green’ options

Friday, May 8th, 2009

Local products and services to be shown at fairgrounds event

Stefanie Knowlton • Statesman Journal • May 7, 2009

Salem’s first green living show opens Friday with everything from organic clothes to alternative fuels.

The two-day Green Expo gives residents a chance to see environmentally friendly products and services offered locally, said organizer Kaleb Ramsay with Willamette Valley Productions.

More than 60 companies and organizations will tout sustainable ideas including solar power, organic food, alternative transportation, recycling tools, landscaping and home remodeling.

The show also includes free seminars and electronics recycling services.

Willamette Valley Productions produces home shows including the Salem Home and Remodeling Show. The buzz for sustainable products at recent shows helped spark the idea for the new event, Ramsay said.

People keep asking, “How do I make my life more sustainable,” he said, and local companies are clamoring to share new technologies.

One Fair World, formerly Ten Thousand Villages in Salem, will be one of the companies at the Green Expo. The shop sells handmade goods from artisans around the world who earn a fair wage.

“We’re very excited,” said manager Linda Bruce. “Of course we support the whole green effort.”

Public services including Salem-Keizer Transit and Marion County Environmental Services will also have informational booths at the Green Expo.

Similar shows have popped up in Portland, Austin, Toronto and major cities around the United States and Canada.

While Salem’s show can’t compete on that scale, Ramsay said, it does highlight local solutions. He hopes to make the show an annual event in Salem.

“We really hope that the community will support it,” he said.

sknowlto@StatesmanJournal.com or (503) 399-6735

Transportation Safety Month highlights work zones, seatbelts, enforcement

Wednesday, May 6th, 2009

work zone memorial, a seatbelt birthday celebration, several proclamations and enhanced enforcement efforts are just a few of the ways transportation safety advocates around the state will mark May as “Transportation Safety Month.” Governor Kulongoski has proclaimed it so (along with May as Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month) and a variety of events are scheduled, including child car seat clinics, rallies, safety fairs, work zone awareness and more.

“ODOT and all of its divisions — safety, motor carrier, rail, public transit, highway, driver and motor vehicles — work on programs that provide the highest level of safety to the traveling public,” Kulongoski said in his proclamation. “I encourage all Oregonians to join in this observation now, and use safe traveling practices year-round.”

Preliminary figures for 2008 show Oregon had the lowest traffic fatality rate in a decade. And, Oregonians are buckling up in record numbers: 96 percent. Still, 416 people lost their lives in crashes last year. And everyone agrees one loss of life is one too many. Every year, lack of seatbelt use is a major factor in more than half of crash fatalities. For child passengers, it’s especially important to have the right safety seat or booster seat. Throughout May, free child safety seat clinics will be held at fire stations, shopping centers and other locations around the state (see www.childsafetyseat.org for a complete listing).

The year 2008 marks the 50th anniversary of the invention of the seat belt, and it’s just one more way to draw attention to this life-saving tool, according to Carla Levinski.

“I want people to understand that we’ve been hearing about seatbelts for 50 years now, so there’s no excuse for someone not buckling up,” said Levinski, Occupant Protection program manager for the Oregon Department of Transportation. From May 18 – 21, Oregon will participate in the national “Click It or Ticket” campaign, where law enforcement agencies work overtime to monitor seatbelt usage and encourage safe driving.

It should be clear to Oregonians by now, too, that it’s wise to slow down in work zones. Oregon will experience another record year of construction zones on streets, highways and bridges, so safety advocates are reminding people that “orange is your clue” to pay attention and slow down in work zones.

“State highway vehicle volumes have approximately doubled in the past 20 years, increasing the risks for highway construction workers as well as for travelers on the road,” said Anne Holder, Roadway Safety program manager for ODOT. “Drivers need to pay extra attention and slow down as more drivers and their passengers are killed in work zone related crash than workers.”

A work zone memorial is scheduled for May 4 at Portland’s Pioneer Square, remembering the 81 people who have lost their lives in work zone related crashes in the last 10 years. With record volumes of construction on Oregon’s roads, motorists will need to use caution throughout the summer and fall. Because many work zone crashes occur as vehicles enter the work zone, it’s especially important for motorists to slow down as they approach work zones.

For more safety tips, visit ODOT’s Transportation Safety Web site.

For help with child safety seats, refer to the seat manufacturer’s instructions or vehicle owner’s manual, or call ACTS Oregon Child Safety Seat Resource Center at 1-800-772-1315. To view a video on proper car seat installation, visit http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/COMM/carseatvideo.shtml.

The Eco-Friendly “I Do”: Ten Tips for Green Weddings From Hornblower Cruises & Events

Wednesday, May 6th, 2009

May 05, 2009 14:05 ET

SAN FRANCISCO, CA–(Marketwire – May 5, 2009) – An increasing number of couples are saying “I do” to the latest trend in love: green wedding ceremonies.

Thanks to an array of elegant yet eco-friendly options, environmentally conscious couples can honor their commitment to a healthy planet as they commit to each other. Sweethearts often save green by going green, as well. As the average wedding price tops $28,000, according to the Brides.com 2009 American Wedding Study, ecologically responsible choices can help cut costs.

“Hornblower has been helping couples and families celebrate commitment and love for nearly 30 years, and we’ve watched a number of trends evolve,” commented Hornblower Cruises & Events CEO Terry MacRae. “A green wedding is the wedding of today and, based on growing interest from our guests, the wedding of the future.”

Looking to celebrate your wedding day in a green way? Here are a few practical tips, courtesy of the professional wedding planners at Hornblower Cruises & Events.

1. Capitalize on natural beauty and cut decorating costs by choosing a venue with a view. Get married in a park, at the local botanical gardens or on the top deck of a yacht at sunset.

2. Opt for a site that accommodates both your ceremony and reception. When that’s not possible, consider walkable options or seek out a green shuttle service.

3. Book responsible event venues. Hornblower vessels feature ENERGY STAR® appliances, energy efficient hand dryers and light bulbs, and green cleaning products. Some of the company’s cruise packages also include carbon-offset credits.

4. Send save-the-date notices, shower invitations and registry information by email. When mailing printed invitations, choose recycled or post-consumer paper and soy-based ink.

5. For receptions and dinners, source organic fare from area farmers and growers. Hornblower Cruises & Events has established relationships with purveyors who provide seasonal, locally grown produce, sustainable seafood and free-range, organic meats.

6. Adorn your wedding venue with reusable linens and soy candle centerpieces.

7. Select seasonal flowers available locally at the time of your wedding. Better yet, decorate with orchids, potted daisies or other flowering plants that can be enjoyed long after the ceremony.

8. Purchase sustainable, eco-friendly “thank you” gifts. For a long-lasting party favor, send guests home with a packet of seeds or a potted plant centerpiece.

9. After the reception, recycle bottles, cans and plastic containers. Avoid plastic utensils and serving ware. If you must use disposable products, choose recycled or biodegradable alternatives. Hornblower follows responsible merchandising guidelines and has an extensive recycling program that extends beyond the company’s boats.

10. Honeymoon at an eco-resort or sign up to clear trails, teach children or build homes on a volunteer vacation.

Hornblower Cruises & Events operates more than 32 yachts in 6 scenic California cities. Vessels in Berkeley, San Francisco, Marina del Rey, Long Beach, Newport Beach and San Diego welcome shower, rehearsal dinner, wedding and reception groups from 2 to 2,200. Hornblower’s professional event planners assist throughout the planning process to coordinate details and ensure an unforgettable experience.

To learn more about planning weddings and special events with Hornblower, visit www.hornblowerweddings.com or call 1-888-HORNBLOWER (1-888-467-6256).

Our Friendly Shuttles

Currently powered by 100% biodiesel.

Most Recent Entry

Browse by Category

100% biodiesel 100 billion 1869 2010 Affordable Health Care Act 2012 2013 4th of July Adam Yauch adopt a highway Ages and Ages agriculture air pollution air port transportation Alberta Canada Alexana Winery algae algae blooms alternative energy American Chemistry Council Americans animal exctinction animal fats animals apple Archery Summit Athens Atlants Falcons b20 b99 Bamboo Sushi Bangladesh Barack Obama basic rights bear Beastie Boys beer Bengals Berkeley Better Living Show big oil bike bike lanes BikeBar bikes Bill Clinton biodiesel biodynamics Birdfest and Bluegrass Birdfest and Bluegrass Nature Festival birth rate Bison Organic Brewing Black Friday Black Mountain BLIZZAKS blog Bluefin Tuna bluegrass Blues Fest Bobcats Booker T bourbon Bravo Wedding Affair Brazil brew tours brewpubs Buddy Guy bus buses Business Success buy local California Cape Wind Project carbon carbon dioxide carbon emissions carbon foot print carbon legacy Carbon Neutral Challenge carless in portland cars Central America Century Link Field Champoeg Farms charter Chehalem Winery Chernobyl Chicago Chicago Cubs Chicago River China Christmas Christmas tree Cincinnati Reds Cinco De Mayo clean coal clean energy clean energy initiatives Clean Fuels Now climate change coal coal ash cold water laundry colonizing the ocean Columbia Boulevard Columbia Gorge Columbia River Gorge Committed Wedding Event Community Supported Agriculture compost consumption Cooper Mountain Wines cost effective CSM Monitor Cuyahoga River cyclist Daryl Hanna Dave Kestenbaum Daves Killer Bread Dawn of the Bed De Ponte Cellars debris department of defense deposits Dhani Jones dogs dolphins Domaine Drouhin Dr. Robert Ballard drilling drive less Duck Pond eco friendly eco friendly christmas tree eco friendly holiday eco friendly transportation eco portland eco toys ecofriendly EcoHouse ecoShuttle Ecotrope election 2012 electric cars electricity energy environment Environmental Defense EPA facebook Fake Plastic Trees fall travel fauna federal government first thursday fiscal responsibility fish deformities Fish Tale Organic Beer Fisker Karma. Chevy Volt food food supply food waste football Forbes Ford forest park Fourth of July fracking fun Galactic Galleria building George H.W. Bush George W. Bush Germany Glass Candy Glen Jackson Bridge global warming Google Gorge Tour Gov. Schwarzenegger Grain and Gristle Great Willamette Cleanup green beer Green Coach Certification green gifts green house gases green oregon Green Path Green Path Transfers green portland Green Portland Tours green roofs Green Sports Alliance green sprouts Green Tips green transportation green wedding greenest city in america greenloop Grochau Cellars Growing Gardens GrowingGardens growler Happy Hour Holiday Waste Hood River Fruit Loop Hood River Wine Tour hopworks Hopworks Urban Brewery hot green Hotel Monaco Hotel Oregon hoyt arboretum Hurricane Sandy hydrothermal energy Iberdrola Renewables Indiana interstate bicycle highway Italy Ivan Neville Jamal Crawford James Inhofe Jason Jesse and Fiona Yun junk to funk Kentucky Keystone XL Pipeline KGW Lake Michigan Las Vegas LEED Certified Left Coast Cellars Lemelson Vineyards Les Schwab Amphitheatre license plates Little Big Branch lobbyists lobsterman lungs MAC Maceo Parker Macindoe Family Cellars Mark Klosterman Mayor Emanuel McMenamins mcminnville Meatless Monday Memorial Day Miami Erie Canal Microsoft migrating birds military Miss Teen Earth Mississippi River mt hood Mt. Hood Scenic Highway Multnomah Falls MusicFest Northwest MusicfestNW New Jersey New Seasons New Year New York New York City New York Times NFL Niger Nissan Leaf NOAA non partisan northeast Northwest Shingle Recyclers NPR Obama Administration ocean off shore oil platform Ogallala Aquifer Ohio Ohio University oil oil platforms Olympia Olympia Snowe Oregon oregon beaches Oregon Ducks Oregon State University Oregon wines oregon zoo organic coffee overpopulation Ovie Mughelli partisan party pdx pedestrians Philadelphia Eagles pickathon Pink Floyd plastic plastic bag ban plastic bags plate and pitchfork polar ice caps politicians pollution population growth portland Portland Oregon portland oregon in the fall Portland tours Portland Trailblazers powells books preservation President Obama Presidential campaigns Presidential Debates Prius privatized recycling project syndicate pub crawls R99 rain forests Rainbow Wedding Expo rainforest raised gardens recreation recycle recycling Red Lion renewable renewable energy Renewable energy ghost towns reuse Rex Hill Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge Ridgefield Nature Preserve roads Robert Cray Rose Festival Rose Garden Arena safety Safeway Waterfront Blues Festival Sam Adams Sasquatch Music Festival Sauvie Island Sauvie Island Organics Science Daily Seahawks Seattle Seattle Seahawks see portland sewage runoff sharks Sherwood shuttles Siria Bojorquez Small Business Saturday Smith Berry Farms Smithsonian Institue snow Sokol Blosser solar energy solar power Solyndra Soter Vineyards spell check spiders State of the Union stem cell research Steve Miller Band Steven Chu Stoller Vineyards studded tires stumptown coffee Styrofoam subway summer Sun Gold Farms Sunnyside superfund site superstorm sustainability sustainable energy sustainable gift wrapping sustainable living sustainable transportation sustainable travel SW Washington Talk of the Nation Science Friday Tesla Texas Thanksgiving the Antlers The Flaming Lips the Wall Thee Oh Sees Three MIle Island Titanic Toronto tours toxins Toyohashi University of Technology Toyota Prius Trail Blazers transfer service transportation trash trashion travel oregon travel portland Travelocity trees University of Vermont Univore used cooking oil Van Wert Vancouver Canucks vegetable oil veggie oil Viridian Farms washington washington park oregon Washington Post waste free wedding Waterfront Blues Fest waterfront blues festival weddings weekend Will Sampson Willamette River Willamette Riverkeepers Willamette Valley Willamette Valley Vineyards Wilsonville wind energy wind farm wind farms wind power wind turbines Winderlea Vineyards wine wine tasting wine tour wine tours winter Yale Yale Project on Climate Change Communication Yucca Mountain Zanzibar

The Green Commuter

Sign Up for our Quarterly Newsletter to find out what we and the rest of the industry are doing to make Green Commuting work.